British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson, attends CWS event

On November 26th, Chengdu Westminster School held a joint event with Zoological Society of London, supported by the British Consulate General in Chongqing, on the theme of wildlife conservation and maintaining biodiversity. British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson, attended the event.

 

Fifty parents and children, for whom the CWS ethos of social responsibility and community service particularly resonates, were invited to the event. They were joined by the newly-appointed British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson; British Consul General in Chongqing, Stephen Ellison; Sichuan Regional Affairs Officer, Mia Gao and other officials.

 

Our Head Master, Rodney Harris, presents gift to British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson.

 

CWS presents a gift, a collaborative painting themed on biodiversity, to British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson.

 

British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson, awards certification to pupil.

 

British Consul General in Chongqing, Stephen Ellison, awards badge to pupil.

 

Group photo: British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson; British Consul General in Chongqing, Stephen Ellison; CWS Management Team members and pupils.

 

British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson (first from right); British Consul General in Chongqing, Stephen Ellison (third from left); President of Chengdu Ximin Public School Education Technology Co., Ltd, Qin Yi (first from left); Chengdu Westminster School Head Master, Rodney Harris (second from right); Senior Trade and Investment Officer, Education, Elaine Gao (second from left).

 

 

The idea of serving the community and society is central to the mission of CWS, an aspect of education that is just as important as any classroom lesson for children’s personal development. We aspire to help our pupils understand that the school is not a complete representation of the world; that there are a great many causes and opportunities beyond the school worthy of their efforts and support. We aspire to open doors to our pupils, supporting their discovery of their own place in society, and their understanding of how they can make a difference through developing a lifelong commitment to service.

 

Environmental education, through developing an understanding of the relationship between people and nature has never been more important than now. It is a key element of our civic responsibility. We were therefore especially delighted to be able to host an event which reflects our own educational values. The event also featured as part of the “British Festival” serial event hosted by the British Consulate-General in Chongqing. Next year, the world’s focus will be on SW China when Kunming hosts the ‘UN Biodiversity Summit’ in May.

 

Chengdu Westminster School sets up the venue on the theme of biodiversity.

 

 

Through the speeches delivered by Head Master, Rodney Harris; British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson and Chinese project coordinator at Zoology Society of London, Becky Chen, parents and pupils were reminded of the interdependence of human kind and the natural world. By stopping the use of plastic bags, taking a stand against wildlife trading, we can all takes steps towards a more environmentally friendly and sustainable way of living. Protecting biodiversity is not a trendy slogan, but should be a constant reminder that in our own actions we each have a part to play to ensure the survival of plants, animals and marine life for future generations, and a sustainable future for all.

 

Speak up for our friends, bag up your love for wildlife.

 

British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson, talks to pupils.

 

British Consul General in Chongqing, Stephen Ellison, talks to pupils.

 

Speech Excerpts

 

Our Head Master, Rodney Harris, delivers speech.

 

“Each one of us has a part to play in protecting the environment, and maintaining biodiversity. Though our own contribution may seem small, together all our individual actions have the potential to make a real difference.”

Head Master, Rodney Harris

 

 

Chinese project coordinator at The Zoology Society of London, Becky Chen, delivers speech.

 

“In the past 40 years, the Earth has lost 68% of its species and 90% of its wetland system, and only 13% of the ocean have not been damaged. If the history of the earth is condensed into one year, human beings appear in the last 14 minutes, farming in the last one minute, the industrial revolution in the last 2 seconds. And it is during this last 2 seconds, which is the past 200 years, we lost countless treasured species.

 

Our ecosystems are deteriorating due to the expansion of endless plastics, climate change, and the wildlife trading. And as an important member of the earth, human beings should and must take action! Efforts should be made to protect biodiversity! We can choose to live a green and sustainable life, such as adopt green traveling, using sustainable products, reducing the using of disposable plastic products, and refusing wildlife trading. ”

 

Chinese project coordinator at Zoology Society of London, Becky Chen

 

 

British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson, delivers speech.

 

“Biodiversity has declined by more than a quarter in the last 35 years.

The extinction of species is 1,000 times the natural rate and it is estimated that 34, 000 plants and 5,200 animal species face extinction in the future.

Half the calories we eat come from just three of the world’s 30,000 edible plants (rice, wheat and corn).

Biodiversity is fast eroding. The last time anything comparable happened was 65 million years ago, when a third of all species, including the dinosaurs, were killed off in a mass extinction.

Less genetic diversity is a scary thing, as diversity is Mother Nature’s way of planning for, and protecting against, a disaster such as disease or climate change. More genetic diversity means better food security; it’s more likely that some crops will survive despite any adversity.

Re-evaluate your shopping choices. Shop at local farmers’ markets and experiment with heritage varieties, which are often more flavourful than typical supermarket selections.”

 

British Ambassador to China, Caroline Wilson